Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

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Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa is a savory crepe made with a combination of quinoa and lentils, with no rice added. Quinoa dosa is topped with a thin layer of red chutney and stuffed with masala (potato stuffing). Serve this protein-rich,  quinoa Mysore masala dosa with some sambar and coconut chutney for a complete power-packed, healthy meal. 

 

Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

 

QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA

Dosa or also known as Indian savory crepe is a popular dish in South Indian cuisine. Light, and crispy, filled with classic potato filling, served with some sambar and coconut chutney. Dosa makes an excellent breakfast/brunch, lunch, or even dinner for a completely well-balanced meal.

Dosa is served in Indian restaurants around the globe and is much loved by all ages. I grew up eating dosa, my mom used to make dosa quite often. The batter consists of basic rice and lentils, soaked overnight. The next day she would grind the rice and lentils to a smooth consistency batter, and let it ferment for a few hours or until it doubled in size. And there we had a perfect, crisp, appetizing dosa, which I could eat any time of the day.

Traditionally, Dosa is made with fermented dosa batter, made with rice and black gram lentil (urad dal). Here, I am sharing Quinoa dosa, made with a combination of quinoa and lentils, and with no rice added. Thus, making this dosa, light, healthy, fiber, and protein-rich. Quinoa dosa can be enjoyed plain or filled with classic potato stuffing. Add Red chutney to it and you have Quinoa Mysore masala dosa. Either way, this dosa tastes amazing!!

This quinoa dosa does not require to be fermented like a traditional dosa batter. However, I feel that fermenting the dosa batter, improves its flavor and texture, makes it light and airy, and also fermented food is good for gut health.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MASALA DOSA AND MYSORE MASALA DOSA

Masala dosa (stuffed dosa) is one of the most popular dosas, with the stuffing made with potatoes, known as aloo masala.

Mysore masala dosa is a spicier version of masala dosa. Mysore Masala Dosa is popular for its spicy, hot Red Chutney, known as Mysore Masala dosa chutney. This spicy, hot Red chutney is smeared inside the dosa and stuffed with classic potato filling. 

Pic Shown: Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa, served with some Tiffin Sambar and Coconut Chutney

 

Quinoa Masala Dosa - Instant Pot

 

INGREDIENTS FOR QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA

FOR MYSORE MASALA DOSA BATTER

1 cup quinoa

1/2 cup urad gota (black gram hulled)

2 tablespoon chana dal (split chickpeas)

10-12 methi dana (fenugreek seeds)

ADD AT THE TIME OF MAKING DOSA

salt to taste

1/8 teaspoon hing (asafoetida), optional

FOR ALOO MASALA [POTATO STUFFING]

1 recipe aloo masala (potato stuffing)

FOR RED CHUTNEY

1 recipe red chutney (Mysore Masala Dosa Chutney)

Pic Shown: Quinoa, urad gota (black gram hulled), chana dal (split chickpeas)

 

 

QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA BATTER

Making quinoa Mysore masala dosa batter is similar to the traditional dosa batter. The basic steps for preparing the dosa batter remain the same. Soaking the lentils and quinoa for a few hours, grind to a dosa batter consistency, and fermentation process. Traditionally, the dosa batter is fermented, however, for quinoa Mysore masala dosa, you can use the batter right away or chose to ferment.

Here’s a step-by-step guide, for a foolproof dosa batter, to help you make a perfect, paper-thin, dosa. Enjoy!

PREP FOR DOSA BATTER

Soaking lentils and quinoa for a few hours is required for a perfect dosa batter consistency. Here are two ways you can soak the lentils.

CLASSIC SOAKING 

Rinse the lentils thoroughly, and discard any stones or debris. Soak in double the amount of water for a minimum of 4 hours. When lentils re-hydrate they double in size and also become soft. I soak one cup of lentils in 2 cups of water, thus making sure there is enough water for the lentils to re-hydrate.

Rinse the quinoa underwater for a few minutes. Rinsing the quinoa removes its natural coating, known as saponin. Thus, making quinoa taste less bitter. After, the quinoa is rinsed thoroughly soak the quinoa in 2 cups of water for 4 hours. 

QUICK SOAKING 

There are times when I forget to soak the lentils and still what to make this delicious dosa for dinner. How do I do it? Yes, you can still make dosa. I find this method very helpful.

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Remove the pot from the heat. Add lentils and cover the pot. Let it sit in hot water for an hour or two. After an hour or two, the lentils will be ready for dosa batter.

Quinoa can be soaked for the same amount of time as lentils, in simply plain water.

GRIND DOSA BATTER

Grind the dosa batter, using water as needed, into a smooth consistency batter. First grind lentils, using just enough water to grind. Transfer the lentils batter into a bowl.

Now, add quinoa to the blender, and using water as needed grind it into a smooth batter. Transfer the quinoa batter along with lentils batter.

Mix lentils and quinoa batter thoroughly.

The consistency of this batter is similar to a pancake batter.

Let the batter rest for 30 minutes. The batter is ready to be used for making dosa. But, I highly recommend fermenting the dosa for good reasons. Please refer to the post earlier – WHY FERMENT DOSA BATTER

Pic Shown: Prep for Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

 

Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

 

FERMENT DOSA BATTER

You can ferment the Mysore Masala Dosa batter using any of the following methods: Traditional, oven, or using Instant Pot. All 3 methods are discussed below:

FERMENT BATTER USING INSTANT POT

I have used an Instant pot for fermenting the dosa batter. Please refer to the post later for – TRADITIONAL AND OVEN METHOD OF FERMENTING DOSA BATTER

Turn ON the yogurt setting, and set it to 8 hours. Cover the inner pot with a glass lid or any plate that fits on it and let it ferment. 

Note: I left the batter to ferment overnight, around 10-12 hours.

Just before making dosa, add salt to the batter and mix well. The dosa batter is ready to be used.

Pic Shown: Left – batter before fermentation; Right – batter after 12 hours of fermentation

TRADITIONAL METHOD FOR FERMENTING DOSA BATTER

In most homes in India, this is the method used for fermenting the dosa batter. The batter is left on a countertop or in a nice warm place, away from any vent or direct sunlight.

If the weather is nice and warm, the batter ferments in no time. In summer, it only takes a few hours for the batter to ferment. In winters it may take up to a day.

OVEN METHOD FOR FERMENTING DOSA BATTER

This method is quite helpful, especially during winters. If you live in a cold place as I do. With temperatures in the single digits, I find fermenting the batter in an oven efficient and failproof. 

I warm the oven to the lowest temperature setting and turn off the oven. Place the batter inside the oven to ferment. 

Alternatively, if you have an oven light, you can leave the light on and the batter ferments beautifully. 

HOW TO MAKE QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA 

Before you start making dosa, fill a small bowl with ice-cold water, and a couple of paper towels.

Heat a non-stick griddle or a cast iron pan. Sprinkle some water, and wipe it with a damp paper towel. Reduce the heat to low, ladle a spoonful of dosa batter into the center of the griddle.

Starting from the center of the griddle, using a circular motion, spread the dosa batter evenly as possible. 

Turn the heat to medium-high and cook the dosa. Drizzle some ghee or oil, and spread it using a spatula. 

Note: For vegans use oil.

Apply around 1/2 teaspoon of Red chutney, adjust to taste.

Note: As the dosa gets cooked, the center and the edges of the dosa start to brown, as shown in the pic.

Spread a couple of tablespoons of potato stuffing. You can add the filling of your choice before folding the dosa. Please refer to the post later for – TYPES OF FILING / STUFFING FOR QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA 

Run the spatula around the edges of the dosa, and carefully fold the dosa into half, as shown in the pic.

Quinoa Mysore masala dosa is ready to be devoured. Serve dosa hot with some sambar and coconut chutney.

IMPORTANT: Before making the next dosa, reduce the heat to low. Sprinkle some cold water onto the griddle, and wipe it with a damp paper towel. Make sure to bring down the temperature of the griddle.

Note: If the griddle is too hot, the batter will stick to the griddle, and will not be able to spread. To be able to spread the batter, every time you must start with a warm griddle not hot. Continue with the remaining batter.

Pic Shown: How to make Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

 

Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

 

TYPES OF STUFFING FOR DOSA

For the filling or stuffing for the dosa, there are endless possibilities, stuff it to your heart’s desire. From the classic aloo masala or potato filling to the more trendy pav-bhaji filling. Some of the dosa filling my family relishes are:

Classic Aloo Masala [Potato Stuffing]

Pav Bhaji

Paneer Bhurji 

Kheema or Egg Bhurji

Cheese

Pic Shown: Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa served with some Tiffin Sambar and coconut chutney.

 

Quinoa Masala Dosa - Instant Pot

 

PRO TIPS FOR PERFECT QUINOA DOSA BATTER

Soak the lentils for a minimum of 4 hours or until soft enough. 

Use just enough water to grind the lentils and quinoa to a smooth batter consistency. Grind them separately.

You can use a wet/dry stone grinder or a simple mixer grinder to grind the lentils.

If using a mixer grinder, work in small batches. I prefer to grind the lentils in batches. This helps maintain the texture of the batter.

The consistency of the batter is similar to a pancake batter, not too thick or too thin.

Though this batter does not require any fermentation, you can make dosa right away. However, I highly recommend fermenting the batter. Fermentation improves the taste, texture, and fermented batter can be preserved for longer.

TIPS FOR PAPER-THIN, CRISP DOSA

Use a flat bottom ladle, with a larger surface area. It helps spread the batter more evenly and thin. In India, we use a small Katori (flat steel bowl) for foaming the dosa. Katori’s are easily available in most Indian grocery stores.

Once the batter has been poured onto a griddle, work quickly. Using the back of a ladle, evenly spread the batter outwards as thin as possible, using a circular motion.

You can even out the edges with the spatula or remove the excess batter for a thinner, crispier edge.

Drizzle some ghee or oil, for an additional flavor and crispiness.

This is very important, before making the next dosa, reduce the heat to low. Sprinkle some cold water onto the griddle, and wipe it with a damp paper towel. Make sure to bring down the temperature of the griddle.

If the griddle is too hot, the batter will stick to the griddle, and will not be able to spread. To be able to spread the batter, every time you must start with a warm griddle not hot. Continue with the remaining batter.

Pic Shown: Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa served with some Tiffin Sambar, coconut chutney, and Red chutney

 

Quinoa Masala Dosa - Instant Pot

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

WHY FERMENT DOSA BATTER

Fermentation is a natural process, resulting in the breakdown of carbs by microorganisms such as yeast and bacteria. Fermented food has a distinct tart flavor. 

Fermentation promotes good bacteria, known as probiotics. Thus, improves overall health and digestive health, hence making food easy to digest.

Fermentation is an ancient technique of preserving food. Fermented dosa batter can be preserved for longer than the non-fermented batter.

Fermented dosa batter has a great texture, easy to spread, and tastes amazing. 

TYPES OF LENTILS USED FOR QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA

Quinoa Mysore masala dosa can be made with quinoa and a combination of lentils – Urad dal (split black lentils), Moong dal (split mung beans without husk), and Chana dal (split chickpeas). You can also include Moong chilka (split mung beans with husk) and Masoor dal (red lentils) for additional flavor and texture.

For this recipe, I have used 1 cup of quinoa, 1/2 cup of urad gota (black gram hulled), and 2 tablespoons of chana dal (split chickpeas). However, feel free to use lentils of your choice. Make sure to include urad dal (whole, or split black grams, with or without husk) and some chana dal for nice brown color.

I found this combination of quinoa and lentils adds a nice flavor and texture to the dosa. The dosas come out perfect, and paper-thin every single time! Enjoy these healthy, quinoa Mysore masala dosa with some sambar and coconut chutney.

WHAT TYPE OF QUINOA TO USE

Quinoa comes in different colors – white, red, black, and tricolor. I have used white quinoa, as it is the least bitter of all. 

CAN I USE RICE

Yes, you can use white or brown rice along with other ingredients. 1/3 – 1/2 cup of rice is good for this recipe.

ABOUT MYSORE MASALA DOSA BATTER

HOW DO I KNOW IF THE DOSA BATTER IS FERMENTED WELL

The fermentation process takes good 8-12 hours. Keep checking the batter in between to make sure that the fermentation is going well.

A well-fermented batter will almost double in size, will be thick, and fluffy, and will develop small bubbles or air pockets. It also has a distinct tart flavor and starts to smell slightly sour. 

HOW DO I KNOW IF THE BATTER HAS GONE BAD

Fermenting the batter longer can result in the batter going bad. You will notice the color change of the batter. It will start to turn pinkish, smell unpleasant, and may also develop some black spots (mold).

Discard the batter, it is not safe to use.

HOW LONG DOES THE DOSA BATTER STAY FRESH

A well-fermented dosa battery lasts for up to 5-7 days in the refrigerator. 

You can freeze the dosa batter for up to a month. Store it in a freezer-safe container. Defrost the batter in the refrigerator or on a countertop. And your dosa batter is ready for some delicious homemade dosa.

WHAT TYPE OF GRIDDLE TO USE

Cast iron or a thick hard anodized griddle, can be used to make dosa. Make sure you season the cast iron pan well before using it. 

Griddle size 10-13 inches is a perfect size to make homemade dosa. 

I use the hard-anodized dosa tava. Here’s the link to Amazon

 

For cast iron griddle, I prefer the Lodge cast iron. Here’s the link to Amazon.

 

Pic Shown:  Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa, served with some Tiffin Sambar,  coconut chutney, and chili garlic chutney. 

 

Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

 

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RELATED POSTS

Quinoa Idli

Red Chutney [Mysore Masala Dosa Chutney]

Masala For Dosa [Potato Stuffing]

Mixed Lentils Dosa  [no-rice dosa]

Tiffin Sambar [Restaurant-style Sambar]

Coconut Chutney [Dosa Chutney]

How To Make Ghee  

Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa

Jyoti Behrani
Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa is a savory crepe made with a combination of quinoa and lentils, with no rice added. Quinoa dosa is topped with a thin layer of red chutney and stuffed with masala (potato stuffing) and served with some sambar and coconut chutney 
No ratings yet
Prep Time 4 hrs
Cook Time 20 mins
Ferment Time 8 hrs
Total Time 12 hrs 20 mins
Course Breakfast, Breakfast/Brunch, Main Course
Cuisine Indian, South Indian
Servings 8 dosa

Ingredients
  

INGREDIENTS FOR QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA

ADD AT THE TIME OF MAKING DOSA

  • salt to taste
  • 1/8 teaspoon asafoetida (hing), optional

FOR POTATO STUFFING (ALOO MASALA)

FOR RED CHUTNEY (MYSORE MASALA DOSA CHUTNEY)

  • 1 recipe red chutney (Mysore Masala Dosa Chutney)  

Instructions
 

PREP FOR DOSA BATTER

  • Rinse the lentils thoroughly, and discard any stones or debris. Soak in double the amount of water for a minimum of 4 hours.
    Rinse the quinoa thoroughly, and soak the quinoa in 2 cups of water for 4 hours.
    Note: Soak lentils and quinoa separately.

GRIND DOSA BATTER

  • Grind lentils first, using just enough water grind it into a smooth batter. Transfer the lentils batter into a bowl.
  • Add quinoa to the blender, using water as needed grind it into a smooth batter. Transfer the quinoa batter along with lentils batter.
  • Mix lentils and quinoa batter thoroughly.
    Note: The consistency of this batter is similar to a pancake batter.
  • Let the batter rest for 30 minutes. The batter is ready to be used for making dosa. But, I highly recommend fermenting the dosa for good reasons. Please refer to the post earlier - WHY FERMENT DOSA BATTER

FERMENT DOSA BATTER USING INSTANT POT

  • Turn ON the yogurt setting, and set it to 8 hours. Cover the inner pot with a glass lid or any plate that fits on it and let it ferment.
    Note: I left the batter to ferment overnight, around 10-12 hours.
  • Just before making dosa, add salt to the batter and mix well. The dosa batter is ready to be used.

TRADITIONAL METHOD FOR FERMENTING DOSA BATTER

  • Leave the batter on a countertop or in a nice warm place, away from any vent or direct sunlight. If the weather is nice and warm, the batter ferments in no time. In summer, it only takes a few hours for the batter to ferment. In winters it may take up to a day.

OVEN METHOD FOR FERMENTING DOSA BATTER

  • Warm the oven to the lowest temperature setting and turn off the oven. Place the batter inside the oven to ferment. Alternatively, if you have an oven light, you can leave the light on and the batter ferments beautifully. 

HOW TO MAKE QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA

  • To make dosa, you will need
    Hard anodized dosa tava OR
    Cast iron griddle
  • Before you start making dosa, fill a small bowl with ice-cold water, and a couple of paper towels.
  • Heat a non-stick griddle or a cast iron pan. Sprinkle some water, and wipe it with a damp paper towel. Reduce the heat to low, ladle a spoonful of dosa batter into the center of the griddle.
  • Starting from the center of the griddle, using a circular motion, spread the dosa batter evenly as possible.
  • Turn the heat to medium and cook the dosa.
  • Drizzle some ghee or oil, and spread it using a spatula.
    Note: For vegan use oil.
  • As the dosa gets cooked, the center and the edges of the dosa start to brown.
  • Apply around 1/2 teaspoon of Red chutney, adjust to taste.
  • Spread a couple of tablespoons of potato stuffing. You can add the filling of your choice before folding the dosa. Please refer to the post for – TYPES OF STUFFING FOR QUINOA MYSORE MASALA DOSA
  • Run the spatula around the edges of the dosa, and carefully fold the dosa in half.
  • Quinoa Mysore masala dosa is ready to be devoured. Serve dosa hot with sambar and coconut chutney for a complete power-packed, healthy meal. 
  • IMPORTANT: Before making the next dosa, reduce the heat to low. Sprinkle some cold water onto the griddle, and wipe it with a damp paper towel. Make sure to bring down the temperature of the griddle.
    Note: If the griddle is too hot, the batter will stick to the griddle, and will not be able to spread. To be able to spread the batter, every time you must start with a warm griddle not hot. Continue with the remaining batter.
  • This recipe makes around 8, 12-inch dosa.

Notes

Ice cold water helps bring down the temperature of the griddle. 
Please refer to the post for the following:
  1. Why Ferment Dosa Batter
  2. Types Of Stuffing For Quinoa Mysore Masala Dosa
  3. Pro Tips For Perfect Dosa Batter
  4. Pro Tips For Paper-Thin, Crispy Dosa
  5. Frequently Asked Questions
 

Disclaimer

Nutrition values are my best estimates. If you rely on them for your diet, use your preferred nutrition calculator.

Keyword dosa, quinoa dosa, masala dosa, quinoa masala dosa, no rice dosa, lentils dosa, healthy dosa, diabetic friendly dosa,, mysore masala dosa, quinoa mysore masala dosa, quinoa dosa indian recipes, quinoa dosa with fermentation, quinoa dosa without oats, quinoa recipes
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This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. Sneha Sahasrabudhe

    I tried this recipe last night and turned out really well. Thank you so much for sharing

    1. Jyoti Behrani

      Awesome! I am so glad you liked my recipe 🙂 Thanks for sharing your feedback!

  2. Jazz

    Can I use Urad daal instead of Urad Gota?

    1. Jyoti Behrani

      Hi, You can use urad dal instead of urad gota, works just fine. Thanks!

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